Gender

Poverty, Land Resource Management, and Gender Participation in Libokemkem District of Northern Ethiopia

High population pressure and land degradation are threats of food security in the high-lands of Ethiopia. Poverty and food insecurity are closely related phenomena. Both of them compel poor farmers to practice unwise use and resource management, which lead to low resource productivity.This study examines the various factors determining poverty and resource management at a household level with gender perspective in Li-bokemekem district of Ethiopia.

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Journal Article

Participatory research to elicit gender differentiated knowledge of native fruit trees

Both men and women have specific local ecological knowledge of native fruit tree species. Excluding women from research-for-development initiatives is problematic because it can limit their access to the benefits derived from improved managemnet and use of fruit diversity. A study was conducted to better understand the ecological, organizational and marketing aspects of native fruit trees in Sarawak, Malaysia. Participatory research tools were used to explore the knowledge of both women and men about forest resources and benefits.

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Factsheet

On Gender and Plant Breeding

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Blog Post

Microfinance and sustained economic improvement: Women small-scale entrepreneurs in Ethiopia Authors

Women entrepreneurs account for a sizable majority of small-scale entrepreneurs in Africa. A minor change in their capitalization could assure their participation in diverse productive activities and has a large impact on their lives and families, as well as on the economy. While their access to credit is impeded profoundly because of the regulatory constraints imposed by formal financial institutions, on one hand, the informal sector interest rates as high as 300 per cent are literally untenable, on the other.

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Journal Article

Learning about sustainability and gender through Farmer Field Schools in the Taita Hills, Kenya

This research uses transformative learning theory to explore how Farmers Field Schools (FFS) of the Taita Hills, Kenya have contributed to environmental sustainability, with a particular focus on gendered learning. Both genders experienced transformations in their meaning schemes related to farming (e.g., men and women switched their traditional roles in tillage and planting). A significant change in meaning perspective occurred among men who overcame personal biases and a cultural practice of land inheritance for males to now include their daughters.

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Journal Article

Integrating a broader notion of food security and gender empowerment into the African Green Revolution

A Green Revolution for Africa is emerging after decades of neglect of Africa’s agricultural systems. To counter these years of neglect, the then United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan called for “a uniquely African Green Revolution”. Since then, a number of

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Journal Article

Input Choices in Agriculture: Is there a Gender Bias?

This paper examines evidence of gender biases in the decisions of agricultural households, utilizing data from International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics’s village level studies in India (1975–85). The main empirical finding is that households with a high proportion of boys tend to use some agricultural inputs, including fertilizers and irrigation services more intensively than households with girls. This pattern is more pronounced among wealthier households but does not appear to be driven solely by bequest motives or male child labor productivity.

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Journal Article

How resilient are farming households and communities to a changing climate in Africa? A gender-based perspective

In this paper we examine conditions that underlie vulnerability and resilience possibilities for households and communities that face and respond to climate- and other changes, in nine East and West African countries. We base our analysis on a unique integrated qualitative and quantitative dataset composed of household surveys and village focus group studies carried out across a wide range of environments and agricultural systems. We identify human population growth, commercialization of the economy, and natural resource use policies, in addition to weather, as key drivers of change.

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Journal Article

How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations?

Why do men and women adopt agricultural technologies at different rates? Evidence from Ghana suggests that gender-linked differences in the adoption of modern maize varieties and chemical fertilizer result from gender-linked differences in access to complementary inputs.

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Journal Article

How Does Gender Affect Sustainable Intensification of Cereal Production in the West African Sahel? Evidence from Burkina Faso

Better understanding of gender differences in the adoption of agricultural intensification strategies is crucial for designing effective policies to close the gender gap while sustainably enhancing farm productivity. We examine gender differences in adoption rates, likelihood and determinants of adopting strategy sets that enhance yields, protect crops, and restore soils in the West African Sahel, based on analysis of cereal production in Burkina Faso.

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Journal Article