Production

Gender Roles in Cassava Processing Activities among Processors in Ogo-Oluwa Local Government Area of Oyo Stat

Ogunleye et al. examine men's and women's roles in cassava processing activities in Ogo-Oluwa local government area of Oyo state, Nigeria. It posits that there is no significant difference between men and women's participation in cassava processing activities. The study selected 40 men and 40 women through a multi-stage random sampling technique. Interviews were the primary means of data collection, and data was analyzed through frequency counts, percentages, Chi-squares, and t-tests.

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Media Type: 
Journal Article
Citation: 
Ogunleye, K.Y., R.G. Adeola and I.O. Ibigbami. 2008. ‰ÛÏGender Roles in Cassava Processing Activities among Processors in Ogo-Oluwa Local Government Area of Oyo State.‰Û

Analysis of Cassava Value Chain in Nigeria From a Pro-Poor and Gender Perspective of Farming Households in Southwest Nigeria

Apata's presentation offers a method for conducting a qualitative and quantitative study on gender issues in cassava value chains. For many, this will be a very basic introduction to value chains and qualitative and quantitative research. This presentation reviews research conducted by Apata in Southwest Nigeria on the strategies and opportunities that can increase women's participation along cassava value chains. The study was conducted among 300 cassava farmers using both qualitative and quantitative data. Apata used both a Poisson model regression and a factor analysis.

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Citation: 
Apata, T. n.d. Analysis of Cassava Value Chain in Nigeria, From a Pro-Poor and Gender Perspective of Farming Households in Southwest, Nigeria. Presentation conducted for AGRODEP, n.d. Dakar: AGRODEP.

An Ex-Ante Evaluation of Improved Cassava Varieties on Gender Relations in Migori District, Kenya

Andima et al. present a case study that documents the development of a ‰ÛÏgender sensitive tool for impact evaluation‰Û for agricultural technology that will be used in Kenya. The tool is a modified Gender Analysis Matrix (GAM) used by KARI researchers in Migori district. In this case study, researchers test the GAM in relation to the introduction of pest-resistant cassava varieties in Migori. The matrix examines labor, time, tools, land, cash, funds, food, and social standing in cassava production.

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Media Type: 
Case study
Citation: 
Andima, D., J. Ogecha, O. Sospeter, and N. Otiego. 2009. An Ex-Ante Evaluation of Improved Cassava Varieties on Gender Relations in Migori District, Kenya. Available on SSRN.

Gender and Cropping: Cassava in Sub-Saharan Africa

Curran and Cook examine the cassava value chain in Nigeria, DRC, Ghana, Tanzania, Angola, and Uganda. They delineate men and women's roles and responsibilities in cassava production along each step of the value chain, including land preparation, plant propagation, soil fertility and cassava production, crop maintenance, harvest, post-harvest processing, and consumption and sale. They conclude that women provide much of the labor throughout the cassava production cycle, but are less involved in marketing, particularly as profits for cassava products increase.

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Citation: 
Curran, S, and J Cook. 2009. Gender and Cropping: Cassava in Sub-Saharan Africa. Prepared for the Science and Technology Team of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Seattle: University of Washington

Constraints to Smallholder Participation in Cassava Value Chain Development in Zambia

Cassava is a staple food in Zambia second only in importance to maize. An estimated thirty percent of Zambians - about 4 million people - consume cassava as part of their staple diet. The majority of these cassava consumers live in the northern part of the country covering Northern, Luapula, Northwestern and Western Provinces and parts of the Copperbelt which are also the main growing and consuming areas of the crop, and have been so since the introduction of cassava to Africa by the early Portuguese travellers and colonists.

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Citation: 
Poole, N., M. Chitundu, R. Msoni, and I. Tembo. 2010. Constraints to Smallholder Participation in Cassava Value Chain Development in Zambia. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Cassava Commercialization in Malawi

Malawi continues to rely on maize for household food security. Policies to enhance food security continue to target maize production. Traditionally production and use of cassava was localized in lakeshore areas until the past two decades when maize production was increasingly affected by rainfall variability. Cassava as an alternate food crop has rapidly gained popularity and commercialization of the cassava sector is steadily taking off.

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Media Type: 
Working Paper
Citation: 
Kambewa, E. Cassava Commercialization in Malawi. 2010. MSU International Development Working Paper 109. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University.

Sustainable Inclusion of Smallholders in the Emerging High Quality Cassava Flour Value Chains in Africa: Challenges for Agricultural Extension Services

Building on research conducted under the Cassava: Adding Value for Africa (C:AVA) Project, Adebayo et al. examine the main challenges to cassava extension service partners in Nigeria, Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda, and Malawi. The authors explore ways to limit the exclusion of smallholders from the commercialization of cassava production and marketing.

Media Type: 
Journal Article
Citation: 
Adebayo, K., L. Abayomi, A. Abass, N.T. Dziedzoave, L. Forsythe, R.J. Hillocks, R. Gensi, R.W. Gibson, A.J. Graffham, P. Ilona, U.K. Kleih, R.I. Lamboll, G. Mahende, A.M. Martin, G.E. Onumah, A.W. Orr, H. Posthumus, L.O. Sanni, V. Sandifolo, and A. Westby. 2010. ‰ÛÏSustainable Inclusion of Smallholders in the Emerging High Quality Cassava Flour Value Chains in Africa: Challenges for Agricultural Extension Services.‰Û Journal of Agricultural Extension 14(1).

Development of Inclusive Markets in Agriculture and Trade

This study is based on both secondary literature and primary data collection to provide the background and purpose of the DIMAT value chain project, and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats facing the cassava value chain in Uganda. Overall, there is a significant domestic demand for cassava and an external demand. Cassava processing in Uganda has potential, and the government of Uganda has established centers to address key constraints to Uganda.

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Media Type: 
Working Paper
Citation: 
Kilimo Trust. 2012. Development of Inclusive Markets in Agriculture and Trade (DIMAT): The Nature and Markets of Cassava Value Chains in Uganda. Kampala: United Nations Development Programme.

Cassava Production and Gender Factor Challenges Affecting Cassava Production in Ebonyi State, Nigeria

Igberi and Awoke an empirical record on the production and marketing of cassava in Ebonyi state, Nigeria. The study collected data through multi-stage and purposive sampling techniques. Two hundred forty farmers were interviewed (120 men and 120 women) and data were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of the data shows that income level, access to markets, equipment and appropriate technology, level of education, access to education, access to extension services, and technology are all challenges to cassava production.

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Media Type: 
Journal Article
Citation: 
Igberi, C.O. and M.U. Awoke. 2013. ‰ÛÏCassava Production and Gender Factor Challenges Affecting Cassava Production in Ebonyi State, Nigeria.‰Û Journal of Agriculture and Veterinary Science 2(5): 21‰ÛÒ24.

Review of Gender and Value Chain Analysis, Development, and Evaluation Toolkits

Mutua et al. review a number of gender and value chain studies, including many of the studies mentioned in this review, in order to make several recommendations for gender and value chain integration. They argue that integrating gender into value chains should be the norm, as they provide necessary insights. Furthermore, it is important to consider institutions of power, including the household, market, and state, when assessing gender concerns in the value chain. Mutua et al.

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Media Type: 
Toolkit
Citation: 
Mutua, E., J. Njuki, and E. Waithanji. 2014. Review of Gender and Value Chain Analysis, Development, and Evaluation Toolkits. Nairobi: International Livestock Research Institute.