Cereals

Footprint of Agriculture: Cereal Crops

Cereals account for 50 percent of the average daily caloric intake in Africa. Wheat and rice are particularly important, accounting for 30 percent and 16 percent of cereal calories consumed, respectively. Cereal production in Africa is substantial, but it is not enough to meet demand; the continent must import about 55 percent of consumed wheat and more than 30 percent of consumed rice (FAO 2012). Understanding where half of the continent’s calories (both vegetal and animal) are grown, and how intensively, is vital to increasing productivity and enhancing food security.

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Book chapter

Gender research integration into Dryland Cereals Research

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Conference Materials

Gender, generation and cereal crop intensification in Mali

In Mali, stagnating yields of dryland cereals—excepting maize—are often attributed to limited use of fertilizer and declining land quality. In the Sudanian Savanna of Mali, as elsewhere in the West African Sahel, dryland cereals are grown on fields managed collectively and individually by extended families that span multiple generations and several households, headed by a responsible elder. The roles of women and youth in farm production are changing.

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Working Paper

Gender Differentials in the Productivity of Cereal Crop Farmers a case study of maize farmers in Oluyole local government area of Oyo State.

This study broadly investigated in details, Gender and Productivity Differentials among maize farmers in Oluyole Local Government Area of Oyo State. In its specific objectives, it describes the socio-economic characteristics of the farmers, analyze the factors that affect maize production, as well as compare the productivities of the male and female cassava farmers in the study area. A farm-level data was collected from sampling technique from five major farming settlements (i.e., Onidajo, Akintola, Alata, Abanla and Onipe).

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Journal Article

Feeding 11 billion on 0.5 billion hectare of area under cereal crops

Despite impressive increase in global grain production since 1960s, there are 795 million food-insecure and similar to 2 billion people prone to malnutrition. Further, global population of 7.4 billion in 2016 is projected to increase to 9.7 billion by 2050, with almost all increase occurring in developing countries. Thus, it is recommended that global food production be increased by 60 to 70% between 2005 and 2050. Global crop production increased threefold between 1965 and 2015 with a net increase of only 67 million ha (Mha) of cropland area.

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Journal Article

CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Cereals, Food Security, Better Health and Economic Growth for the Worlds’ Most Vulnerable Poor

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Book

Cereals Market Liberalization in Mali

This paper analyzes the impact of the process of liberalization of cereal markets in Mali. Most consumers, including food-deficient farmers, and private grain traders have benefited from the liberalization. Efforts to tie the liberalization to a minimum support price for farmers failed because the state lacked the resources to guarantee the support price.

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Journal Article

Cereals demand in the Sahel and potential impacts of regional cereals protection

Recent policy debate in the Sahel has focused on a regional protection zone for cereals. This paper discusses crosscountry evidence of consumption patterns and the sensitivity of these to policy variables, and considers potential income-distribution and efficiency impacts of a rice tariff increase. A tariff would hurt the poor in the short term because the poor depend to a large extent on rice as a “fast food,” purchased from street vendors. The trend toward rice consumption is a long-term, structural phenomenon, linked to urbanization, rather than to short-term price changes.

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Journal Article

Cereal Complex Carbohydrates and their Contribution to Human Health

Population studies have shown that whole grain consumption is associated with diminished risk of serious, diet-related diseases, which are major problems in wealthy industrialised economies and are emerging in developing countries with greater affluence. These conditions include coronary heart disease, certain cancers (especially of the large bowel), inflammatory bowel disease and disordered laxation. Carbohydrates are important contributors to the health benefits of whole grains. Insoluble non-starch polysaccharides (NSP, major components of dietary fibre) are effective laxatives.

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Journal Article

Can sub-Saharan Africa meet its future cereal food requirement?

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