Gender issues in crop-small ruminant integration in West Africa.

The role of gender in ensuring an enhanced integrated crop-livestock production system in West Africa cannot be underestimated. This paper is based on data generated from the baseline survey for the crop livestock project from 960 households across Gambia, Mali, Ghana and Benin. It highlights the contribution of gender towards achieving an integrated crop-livestock system in West Africa. Results revealed that females play an active role in grain and fodder marketing such that 11.80%, 41.70%, 46.40% and 66.90% of legumes grain marketing in Gambia, Mali, Ghana and Benin respectively were carried out by females. Females were also active in drying, harvesting and sowing. Despite their active participation in production, their role in decision making as to when to sell livestock was limited. Only 17.0%, 5.4%, 13.0% and 47.4% of females in Gambia, Mali, Ghana and Benin respectively took part in decision making as to when to sell livestock in the household. Their role in deciding how to spend income from livestock sale was also limited. Only 20.0%, 6.2%, 13.5% and 35.2% in Gambia, Mali, Ghana and Benin respectively had this opportunity. To conclude, women play a significant role in production and marketing within the system. Their ability to benefit from the system however depends on the scale of involvement and their role in decision making and access to economic resources. Improving their capacity and strengthening their resource base will enable them play an active role and achieve maximum benefit from the integration process.

Citation: 
Osei-Adu, J., Ennin, S. A., Asante, B. O., Adegbidi, A., & Mendy, M. (2015). Gender issues in crop-small ruminant integration in West Africa. International Journal of Agricultural Extension, 3(2), 137-147.
Year: 
2015
Media Type: 
Journal Article
Geographic Focus: 

Latest Updates