Collective Action, Gender Relations and Social Inclusion in African Agricultural Markets. Policy Brief 64.

Baden's report draws on research conducted by Oxfam between 2010 and 2012. The research establishes that women get significant economic benefits from group membership. They had better access to credit, more and better marketing opportunities, and higher revenues compared to other women who are not members in collective action groups. Furthermore, both women and men farmers benefit from participation in mixed-sex groups. Group participation plays an important role in ensuring that women have access to productive assets. The study also examined women-only marketing groups, noting that they can face disadvantages if they do not have political connections. Women's collective marketing groups are generally more successful in high-value domestic markets that do not require land, such as shea, rather than high-value markets that require land and significant inputs.

Citation: 
Baden, S. 2014. Collective Action, Gender Relations and Social Inclusion in African Agricultural Markets. Policy Brief 64. Brighton: Oxfam Great Britain.
Year: 
2014
Media Type: 
Policy Brief

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