West Africa

Assessing climate adaptation options and uncertainties for cereal systems in West Africa

In the coming decades, the already fragile agricultural system in West Africa will face further challenges in meeting food security, both from increasing population and from the impacts of climate change. Optimal prioritization of adaptation investments requires the assessment of various possible adaptation options and their uncertainties; successful adaptations of agriculture to climate change should not only help farmers deal with current climate risks, but also reduce negative (or enhance positive) impacts associated with climate change using robust climate projections.

Geographic Focus: 
Media Type: 
Journal Article
Citation: 
Guan, K., Sultan, B., Biasutti, M., Baron, C., & Lobell, D. B. (2017). Assessing climate adaptation options and uncertainties for cereal systems in West Africa. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 232, 291-305. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2016.07.021

Against the grain and to the roots Maize and cassava innovation platforms in West and Central Africa

This book introduces a tool for collective effort in agricultural research. ‰ÛÏIt examines how innovation platforms work by bringing together a group of diverse but interdependent stakeholders to meet pressing food security demands with respect to maize and cassava food crop systems and value chains in West and Central Africa. The publication reveals the need for new thinking and new organizational constellations rooted in local and national dynamics, alongside an appreciation and inclusion of long-standing actors.

Media Type: 
Book
Citation: 
Sanyang, S., R. Pyburn, R. Mur and G. Audet-BÌ©langer. Against the grain and to the roots Maize and cassava innovation platforms in West and Central Africa (eds). CORAF/WECARD and Royal Tropical Institute (KIT).

Collective Action, Gender Relations and Social Inclusion in African Agricultural Markets. Policy Brief 64.

Baden's report draws on research conducted by Oxfam between 2010 and 2012. The research establishes that women get significant economic benefits from group membership. They had better access to credit, more and better marketing opportunities, and higher revenues compared to other women who are not members in collective action groups. Furthermore, both women and men farmers benefit from participation in mixed-sex groups. Group participation plays an important role in ensuring that women have access to productive assets.

Media Type: 
Policy Brief
Citation: 
Baden, S. 2014. Collective Action, Gender Relations and Social Inclusion in African Agricultural Markets. Policy Brief 64. Brighton: Oxfam Great Britain.