Tanzania

Characteristics of banana production and sales in Kilimanjaro: security of household economy pursued by "female products

The security of the household economy on the basis of "security of food consumption" and "security of daily necessities consumption" has been pursued so far at Lukani village, on the western slope of Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, through the cultivation of maize and "female products" (bananas, milk, beans, etc.,). In contrast, "male products" such as coffee have pursued economic rationality and maximum revenues.

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Journal Article
Citation: 
Tsujimura, H. (2013). Characteristics of banana production and sales in Kilimanjaro: security of household economy pursued by "female products." Natural Resource Economics Review, Kyoto University. 85-101.

Analysis of gender roles within Chagga households that practice ripe banana street selling in Moshi Rural, Tanzania

Gender roles in most societies are classified based on culture-stereotypes which are socially constructed and can therefore be reconstructed. These roles affect household distribution of activities and performance as often division of household labour is based on gender.

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Journal Article
Citation: 
Minde, J. J. (2015). Analysis of gender roles within Chagga households that practice ripe banana street selling in Moshi Rural, Tanzania. Developing Country Studies. 9-16.

Gender Mainstreaming: myths and measurement in higher education in Ghana and Tanzania

Morley raises key concerns on gender mainstreaming, some of which include the way in which women are constructed as a unified analytical category, and how gender equality is frequently reduced to issues of representation. Morley's article also critically interrogates how gender mainstreaming initiatives can be undermined by sexist practices such as sexual harassment.

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Journal Article
Citation: 
Morley, L. 2010. ‰ÛÏGender Mainstreaming: myths and measurement in higher education in Ghana and Tanzania.‰Û Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 40 (4):533-550.