sub-Saharan Africa

Gender and Cropping: Cassava in Sub-Saharan Africa

Curran and Cook examine the cassava value chain in Nigeria, DRC, Ghana, Tanzania, Angola, and Uganda. They delineate men and women's roles and responsibilities in cassava production along each step of the value chain, including land preparation, plant propagation, soil fertility and cassava production, crop maintenance, harvest, post-harvest processing, and consumption and sale. They conclude that women provide much of the labor throughout the cassava production cycle, but are less involved in marketing, particularly as profits for cassava products increase.

Geographic Focus: 
Citation: 
Curran, S, and J Cook. 2009. Gender and Cropping: Cassava in Sub-Saharan Africa. Prepared for the Science and Technology Team of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Seattle: University of Washington

Gender-Related Impacts and the Work of the International Agricultural Research Centers Gender-Related Impacts and the Work of the International Agricultural Research Centers CGIAR Study Paper Number 17.

Jiggins argues that the neglect of gender issues in agricultural research and technology development has resulted in reduced agricultural output and household welfare. Jiggins states that normative views of gender roles are challenged a number of issues, including the scale of women's participation in agricultural production, food processing, and trade. Jiggins argues that the research community pays insufficient attention to institutional barriers which prohibit women from accessing extension, extension agents, and relevant agricultural information.

Topics: 
Media Type: 
Working Paper
Citation: 
Jiggins, J. 1986. Gender-Related Impacts and the Work of the International Agricultural Research Centers Gender-Related Impacts and the Work of the International Agricultural Research Centers CGIAR Study Paper Number 17. Washington, D.C.: The World Bank.

Gender, Growth and Poverty Reduction: Special Program of Assistance for Africa, 1998. World Bank Technical Paper No. 428.

Blackden and Bhanu examine the relationship between gender inequality, growth, and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa. They argue that markets and household economies are independent, and that men and women have structural roles within the economy. The technical paper concludes that gender-based constraints, namely gender-based asset inequality, results in inefficiency. Improving women's access to inputs will increase growth, efficiency, and welfare.

Topics: 
Geographic Focus: 
Media Type: 
Technical Paper
Citation: 
Blackden, M. and C. Bhanu 1999. Gender, Growth and Poverty Reduction: Special Program of Assistance for Africa, 1998. World Bank Technical Paper No. 428. Washington, DC: World Bank.

Collective Action, Gender Relations and Social Inclusion in African Agricultural Markets. Policy Brief 64.

Baden's report draws on research conducted by Oxfam between 2010 and 2012. The research establishes that women get significant economic benefits from group membership. They had better access to credit, more and better marketing opportunities, and higher revenues compared to other women who are not members in collective action groups. Furthermore, both women and men farmers benefit from participation in mixed-sex groups. Group participation plays an important role in ensuring that women have access to productive assets.

Media Type: 
Policy Brief
Citation: 
Baden, S. 2014. Collective Action, Gender Relations and Social Inclusion in African Agricultural Markets. Policy Brief 64. Brighton: Oxfam Great Britain.