Mali

Modelling cereal crops to assess future climate risk for family food self-sufficiency in southern Mali

Future climate change will have far reaching consequences for smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, the majority of whom depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. Here we assessed the farm-level impact of climate change on family food self-sufficiency and evaluated potential adaptation options of crop management. Using three years of experimental data on maize and millet from an area in southern Mali representing the Sudano-Sahelian zone of West Africa we calibrated and tested the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) model.

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Journal Article
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Traore, B., Descheemaeker, K., Van Wijk, M. T., Corbeels, M., Supit, I., & Giller, K. E. (2017). Modelling cereal crops to assess future climate risk for family food self-sufficiency in southern Mali. Field Crops Research, 201, 133-145.

Gender, generation and cereal crop intensification in Mali

In Mali, stagnating yields of dryland cereals—excepting maize—are often attributed to limited use of fertilizer and declining land quality. In the Sudanian Savanna of Mali, as elsewhere in the West African Sahel, dryland cereals are grown on fields managed collectively and individually by extended families that span multiple generations and several households, headed by a responsible elder. The roles of women and youth in farm production are changing.

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Working Paper
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Gouse, M., Sengupta, D., Zambrano, P., & Zepeda, J. F. (2016). Genetically Modified Maize: Less Drudgery for Her, More Maize for Him? Evidence from Smallholder Maize Farmers in South Africa. World Development, 83, 27-38. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2016.03.008

Gender and Variety Selection: Farmer's Assessment of Local Maize Varieties in Southern Mali

In order to respond to the variability of local conditions and production objectives, farmers in southern Mali generally grow several varieties of maize, representing different characteristics. Their selection criteria have been reported to be quite different from those of breeders. Moreover, women's criteria for processing and consumption have often been neglected. The complexity and variability of farmers' production strategies and objectives make it difficult to grasp farmers' selection criteria, for both gender.

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Journal Article
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Ragasa, C., Berhane, G., Tadesse, F., & Taffesse, A. S. (2013). Gender Differences in Access to Extension Services and Agricultural Productivity. The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, 19(5), 437-468. doi:10.1080/1389224X.2013.817343

Gender and Variety Selection: Farmer's Assessment of Local Maize Varieties in Southern Mali

In order to respond to the variability of local conditions and production objectives, farmers in southern Mali generally grow several varieties of maize, representing different characteristics. Their selection criteria have been reported to be quite different from those of breeders. Moreover, women's criteria for processing and consumption have often been neglected. The complexity and variability of farmer' production strategies and objective make it difficult to grasp farmer's selection criteria, for both gender.

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Journal Article
Citation: 
Defoer, T., Kamara, A., & Groote, H. D. (1997). Gender and variety selection: Farmers assessment of local maize varieties in Southern Mali. African Crop Science Journal, 5(1). doi:10.4314/acsj.v5i1.27872

Gender and Generation: an intra-household analysis on access to resources in Southern Mali

This paper analyses the differences of access to productive resources within the household of southern Mali. Information was collected through separate group discussions with older men, younger men, and women from six villages. This information was complemented with a formal survey of 96 households in 12 villages. It was found that the essential differences between individuals related to access are gender, age, marriage and being the head of the household.

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Journal Article
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Groote, H. D., & Coulibaly, N. (1998). Gender and generation: an intra-household analysis on access to resources in Southern Mali. African Crop Science Journal, 6(1). doi:10.4314/acsj.v6i1.27827

Cereals Market Liberalization in Mali

This paper analyzes the impact of the process of liberalization of cereal markets in Mali. Most consumers, including food-deficient farmers, and private grain traders have benefited from the liberalization. Efforts to tie the liberalization to a minimum support price for farmers failed because the state lacked the resources to guarantee the support price.

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Journal Article
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Staatz, J. M., Dioné, J., & Dembélé, N. N. (1989). Cereals market liberalization in Mali. World Development, 17(5), 703-718. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0305-750X(89)90069-7

Gender issues in crop-small ruminant integration in West Africa.

The role of gender in ensuring an enhanced integrated crop-livestock production system in West Africa cannot be underestimated. This paper is based on data generated from the baseline survey for the crop livestock project from 960 households across Gambia, Mali, Ghana and Benin. It highlights the contribution of gender towards achieving an integrated crop-livestock system in West Africa.

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Journal Article
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Osei-Adu, J., Ennin, S. A., Asante, B. O., Adegbidi, A., & Mendy, M. (2015). Gender issues in crop-small ruminant integration in West Africa. International Journal of Agricultural Extension, 3(2), 137-147.