Kenya

Traditional food crop marketing in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does gender matter?

The present study aims to contribute to the scarce literature on traditional food crop marketing by analysing the factors influencing (a) the household's decision to participate in the market and (b) the selling prices obtained by the household. Using an econometric approach, we analyse household data from 270 finger millet producers in western Kenya. A main focus of the study lies on the role of gender and farmer group participation.

Geographic Focus: 
Media Type: 
Journal Article
Citation: 
Handschuch, C., & Wollni, M. (2016). Traditional food crop marketing in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does gender matter?. The Journal of Development Studies, 52(3), 343-359.

Zoonotic diseases: who gets sick, and why? Explorations from Africa

Global risks of zoonotic disease are high on policy agendas. Increasingly, Africa is seen as a ‰Û÷hotspot', with likely disease spillovers from animals to humans. This paper explores the social dynamics of disease exposure, demonstrating how risks are not generalised, but are related to occupation, gender, class and other dimensions of social difference.

Media Type: 
Journal Article
Citation: 
Dzingirai, V., Bett, B., Bukachi, S., Lawson, E., Mangwanya, L., Scoones, I., ... & Winnebah, T. (2016). Zoonotic diseases: who gets sick, and why? Explorations from Africa. Critical Public Health, 1-14.

The Missing Link: Working with Women and Men in Agricultural Development.

Njuki argues that agricultural development intended to benefit women is more successful when it also includes men. She makes her point using the story of a Malawian women's experience growing beans.

Geographic Focus: 
Media Type: 
Video
Citation: 
Njuki, J. 2010. The Missing Link: Working with Women and Men in Agricultural Development. TED talk (video).

Gender, agricultural commercialization, and collective action in Kenya

Fischer and Matin argue that women are disadvantaged in agriculture due to gender disparities in access to productive resources. They argue that while farmer collective action can improve smallholder access to markets and technology, men's membership in farmer groups can also have a negative marginal effect on dietary quality. However, Fischer and Matin argue that the negative gender implications of farmer groups can be reduced or avoided when women form groups that are exclusively controlled by women.

Geographic Focus: 
Media Type: 
Journal Article
Citation: 
Fischer, E., & Qaim, M. (2012). Gender, agricultural commercialization, and collective action in Kenya. Food Security, 4(3), 441-453.

Gender Aware Approaches in Agricultural Programmes: A study of Sida-supported Agricultural Programmes.

This report overviews a number of gender and agriculture programs, intended to inform Sida programming on gender integration. The report studies agricultural programs in Zambia, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Nicaragua, and Kenya. Main findings from the overview suggest that extension services need to be more integrated in a majority of the countries surveyed. Furthermore, interventions should focus on providing an asset base for women that combines different assets and services. Asset provision must be tailored to women's specific needs.

Topics: 
Media Type: 
Working Paper
Citation: 
Farnworth, C. 2010. Gender Aware Approaches in Agricultural Programmes: A study of Sida-supported Agricultural Programmes. Sida Evaluation.

Women Farmers Adapting to Climate Change.

Abeka et al. outline four case studies on how climate change affects women farmers and how women develop coping mechanisms in response to climate change. Studies from India, Peru, and Kenya draw on interviews and focus groups with women. In India, researchers found that women are the first members of the household to deal with natural disasters or extreme weather conditions such as flooding and landslides. Women deal with these effects by attempting to choose varietals that will survive in the face of extreme weather.

Geographic Focus: 
Media Type: 
Case study
Citation: 
Abeka, S., S. Anwer, R. B. Huamani, V. Bhatt, S. Bii, M.B. Prissy, R.A Rejina, H.R. Senisse, and G.V. Soria. 2012. Women Farmers Adapting to Climate Change. Stuttgart: Diakonisches Werk der EKD e.V.