Production

Enhancing Rice Productivity in West Africa Through Genetic Enhancement

Rice yields have stagnated in West Africa at 1 to 2 Mg ha?1 because of unfavorable rice environments and poor management practices. Interspecific rice cultivars, the New Rice for Africa (NERICA), were developed by crossing Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.) and African rice (O. glaberrima Steud.) to improve upland and lowland rice productivity in resource-poor farmers’ fields.

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Journal Article

Determination of Inter Row Spacing and Seed Rate on Productivity of Finger Millet [Eleusine Coracana (L.) Gaertn.], At Jinka, Southern Ethiopia

A field experiment was undertaken at Jinka Agricultural Research Center to determine the effect of inter row spacing and seed rate on productivity of finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.], at Jinka. The experiment was conducted with four levels of inter row spacing (30, 45, 60 and 75 cm) and three levels of seed rate (5, 10 and 15 kg ha-1). The treatments were arranged factorially and laid out in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. Phenological and growth parameters such as yield and yield components, total biomass and harvest index were studied.

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Journal Article

Common challenges in gum arabic production and commercialization in West Africa: a comparative study of Cameroon, Niger and Senega

As gum arabic is widely used in food and non-food industries, demand is high all over the world. Still, smaller production countries in West Africa such as Cameroon, Niger and senegal seem to have so many difficulties producing and commercializing gum arabic that their market shares have declined significantly over the years despite their production potential. This paper reviews the development of the gum arabic market chains in Cameroon, Niger and senegal, in order to evaluate the limiting factors and identify appropriate strategies to the sector progress.

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Journal Article

Caught in a Productivity Trap: A Distributional Perspective on Gender Differences in Malawian Agriculture

Our study provides a nationally representative analysis of the gender gap in agricultural productivity in Malawi. We decompose the gap, for the first time, at the mean and selected points of the agricultural productivity distribution into (i) a portion driven by gender differences in levels of observable attributes, and (ii) a portion driven by gender differences in returns to the same set of observables.

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Journal Article

Against the grain and to the roots Maize and cassava innovation platforms in West and Central Africa

This book introduces a tool for collective effort in agricultural research. ‰ÛÏIt examines how innovation platforms work by bringing together a group of diverse but interdependent stakeholders to meet pressing food security demands with respect to maize and cassava food crop systems and value chains in West and Central Africa. The publication reveals the need for new thinking and new organizational constellations rooted in local and national dynamics, alongside an appreciation and inclusion of long-standing actors.

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Book

Gender Surprises in Food Production, Processing, and Marketing with Emphasis on Cassava in Africa.

Nweke and Enete's report examines farm-level information from 282 villages in six major cassava producing areas in Africa. The data provides evidence of the division of responsibilities on the farm between men and women, but also suggests that these responsibilities are changing as market access improves and technologies become more available. These changes cause men to assume more responsibilities in cassava marketing and processing. The report does not examine the consequences of these shifts.

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Working Paper

Perception and Management of Cassava Manihot Esculent Crantz

Elias, Rival, and McKey discuss how the Makushi subsistence economy and farming practices, food preparation, and cultural and social processes have affected cassava variety and genetic diversity in Guyana. Rival et al. conclude that, based on traditional management and various socio-cultural factors, varietals cannot be defined as separate entities but rather are defined by ‰ÛÏfluid and evolving processes‰Û that change varietals over time. This study provides an example of how socio-cultural factors can directly influence and affect agricultural practice.

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Journal Article

Applying Science and Technology to Enhance Cassava, Dairy, and Maize Value Chains: Cassava Value Chain Overview

This paper highlights many of the key constraints in the cassava value chain, particularly in Nigeria. It argues that there are a number of market inefficiencies and potential technological innovations that must be addressed to improve productivity and chain efficiency. These poor coordination among value chain actors and lack of standards and certification. Production is hampered by low availability of inputs. Fresh cassava value chains face transport bottlenecks.

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Gender Participation in Cassava Processing Activities in Ayetoro Area of Ogun State. Paper presented at the Farm Management Association of Nigeria Conference

Fapojuwo investigates men and women's participation in cassava processing activities in Nigeria. Men and women processors participate in different processing activities and use different processing techniques. The study collected data on these techniques from 240 respondents, then analyzed data using percentage distribution and an analysis of variance. Results established there are significant differences between participation by sex, age, household size, and sources of cassava among men and women processors.

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Gender Differentials in Labour Productivity among Small-Holder Cassava Farmers in Ideato Local Government Area of Imo State, Nigeria

This study examines the gender differentials in labor productivity in Imo State as of 2008 using quantitative methods. Data was collected through a multi-stage random sampling technique of 120 farmers (60 men and 60 women). The study establishes that for men, household size and participation in credit markets is negatively related to labor productivity. For women, household size was negatively related to labor productivity, while access to credit positively related to labor productivity. The methodology differs from that used by Ogunleye et al. and Igberi.

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