Disease

Management of wheat rusts at different growth stages using Nativo 300 SC (trifloxystrobin 100g/L+ tebuconazole 200g/L) fungicide

Rusts (stem, yellow and leaf) remain the most important diseases of wheat worldwide due to their ability to cause severe yield losses in susceptible varieties. Timing of fungicide application in the integrated management of rusts on wheat is critical. This study was conducted to determine the wheat growth stage at which fungicide application can effectively control/reduce the damages caused by rust diseases. Field experiments were conducted in 2013 and 2014 in three locations; Njoro, Eldoret and MauNarok.

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Journal Article

Identification of Resistance Sources to Wheat Stem Rust from Introduced Genotypes in Kenya

Stem rust Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici of wheat is the most important disease in Kenya. Emergence of race Ug99 and other variants virulent to host resistance genes including Sr31 has rendered 95% of Kenyan cultivars susceptible. This study aimed to identify new sources of resistance to stem rust in a collection of exotic genotypes. Three hundred and sixteen wheat genotypes were screened at the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO) in Njoro for two seasons in 2015. The host reaction to disease was evaluated based on the modified Cobb scale.

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Journal Article

Characterization of a putative rice mutant for reaction to rice tungro disease.

Artificial mutations may induce traits that are scarce among natural germplasm sources. This study was conducted to characterize a rice line derived from variety IR64 showing resistance to rice tungro disease (RTD). Approximately 24,000 lines derived from IR64 seeds treated with mutagens were evaluated for reaction to RTD. One of the lines, M4D6 83-1 (MD83), showed enhanced resistance to RTD. MD83 was resistant to rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) and the virus vector, green leafhopper (GLH; Nephotettix virescens Distant).

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Journal Article

Zoonotic diseases: who gets sick, and why? Explorations from Africa

Global risks of zoonotic disease are high on policy agendas. Increasingly, Africa is seen as a ‰Û÷hotspot', with likely disease spillovers from animals to humans. This paper explores the social dynamics of disease exposure, demonstrating how risks are not generalised, but are related to occupation, gender, class and other dimensions of social difference.

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Journal Article